Wednesday, 3 September 2014

A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle


The Mark 3 lineup of Deep Purple may not have been the most commercially successful of their reincarnations, but it was certainly their funkiest - by a country mile. Mid-seventies albums like Burn, Stormbringer and Come Taste the Band saw the group drop their extended guitar solos and take a more introspective look at themselves. In fact it was why Ritchie Blackmore (surely one of the most miserable guitar players ever to have picked up the instrument) left the band. 'I don't play shoeshine music' he told Sounds back in 1974.

How apposite then that this cheeky little mash up finds the Purps sharing a bed with Daft Punk, the behelmeted French funky house duo. I'm guessing vocalist David Coverdale thinks it's a hoot; Blackmore on the other hand probably tried to slap an injunction on it. And, anyway, I think you'll find he nicked the riff for Burn from George Gershwin's Fascinating Rhythm.

6 comments:

  1. Haha. Frankly I loved burn great album an underrated version of the band really.

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  2. 'Burn' is my favourite Purple tune of any era and I know that Singing Bear is a huge fan of the Purps, not sure what he'll make of this.

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  3. I listen to the Mark III albums a lot more than the Mark II ones these days. As you say, they're a lot funkier and I think that makes them more interesting, they really don't sound like any other records, Stormbringer in particular.

    The difference in public perceptions these days of David Coverdale and Ritchie Blackmore is a good reminder to entertainers that if they want prolonged public goodwill (and they should) then they should learn to come across as a warm human being and not take themselves too seriously. I have a lot of time for Coverdale these days, even though I couldn't stand the Hair Metal version of Whitesnake back in the 80s. Blackmore just comes across as an unhappy man.

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  4. Hehe! Nice version. I'd like to hear more Purple based mash-ups. You're probably right about RB being 'miserable' but that didn't stop him being the greatest of all hard rock guitar players, bar none. Mark 3 produced some fine music, although, of course, 'CTTB' was a Mark 4 album with the fabulous Tommy Bolin on board. I do have a problem with the perception that Purple only ever got funky once Coverdale and Hughes were brought in. Listen to the 'Fireball' album in particular, plus parts of 'Machine Head' and there's plenty of funk - Ritchie just lived in denial for some reason; many of his own licks were funky as hell. No other white rock band could ever swing like DP, as one listen to 'Made In Japan' will illustrate. Shoe shine music? I think The Man In Black was having an off-day and was particularly sick of Glenn Hughes by then - not without good reason. Still, it was dumb thing to say and one minute spent with Blackmore's Night would make anyone wish themselves back to 'Stormbringer'.

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    1. You told me as much back in 2012 (see above link to my 'Leo - definitely' post). I believed you then and I believe you now. Thanks for stopping this way again. As a by the by, I did some recording with Blackmore's flute player recently and she said that, contrary to popular opinion, he does have a sense of humour; he just hides it well. Nah, I didn't believe her neither.

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    2. Blimey, John, time goes by. Sorry for repeating myself, though.

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